Congress and the Administration

Fighting for Commonsense Federal Policy to Protect Water and Public Health

Clean Water is Under Attack

The Trump Administration and Congress are waging an all-out attack on our cornerstone protections for clean water. From gutting the Clean Water Act to slashing federal funding to prevent pollution, we must push back against the agenda of corporate polluters and their friends in power. This Administration is the most hostile to clean water we have ever seen, taking steps to roll back or weaken dozens of protections for water, and proposing cuts to EPA’s budget, including water programs, of more than 30%. Congress meanwhile has charged ahead with their polluter friendly agenda, rolling back protections for streams from coal mining, and voting numerous times for additional rollbacks to water protections and budget cuts that would undermine environmental protection.

Protecting Streams and Wetlands

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has proposed repealing the 2015 Clean Water Rule, a commonsense, popular, much-needed, and carefully-developed action taken to protect the nation’s waters from pollution and destruction. The Clean Water Rule protects the small streams that feed drinking water sources across the nation and many wetlands that filter pollution, protect communities from flooding, and recharge groundwater. The members of the Clean Water for All Campaign vigorously oppose this reckless plan and are working to stop this action.

Toxic Power Plants

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, at the request of industry, has started the process of rolling back important pollution standards for wastewater from coal-fired power plants. In 2015, EPA finalized the power plant waste water rule (Steam ELG rule) that, once implemented, would eliminate 1.4 billion pounds of harmful pollutants from being dumped into our waterways each year from coal-fired and other steam electric power plants. This rule was much-needed, as the standards had not been updated in over 30 years, allowing power plants to pass the cost and burden of cleaning up their toxic mess onto downstream communities. Coal-fired power plants are by far the number one source of toxic water pollution in the country, dumping heavy metals like arsenic, lead, mercury, and other harmful chemicals into our rivers, lakes, and bays. Many of these pollutants are known carcinogens and neurotoxins that have serious health impacts, especially for children. Even though the negative health impacts of these toxins are well known and it would cost industry very little to comply with a rule to clean them up, EPA has agreed to an industry petition to delay and reconsider these important standards. EPA has already delayed the standards and is now in the process of further weakening the rule for the most toxic sources of power plant pollution, ignoring concerns from the public and environmental and health groups. This rollback is nothing more than a politically-motivated giveaway to industry – check back here for updates on how you can tell the Administration you do not support this attack on public health protections!

Budgets

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Appropriations

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

State Revolving Fund

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) and the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) are federal and state partnership programs that match federal and state funds in low interest loan programs to finance water projects.

Since its establishment in 1987, the CWSRF, through state administered programs, has provided $118 billion to support more than 38,000 loans. This funding has enabled communities to protect and better manage their water resources including:

  • constructing municipal wastewater facilities,
  • control nonpoint sources of pollution,
  • building decentralized wastewater treatment systems,
  • creating green infrastructure projects,
  • protecting estuaries, and
  • funding other water quality projects.

The DWSRF, established in 1996, has provided more than $32 billion to water systems through more than 12,800 loan and grant agreements. These agreements have enabled water systems to:

  • improve drinking water treatment,
  • fix leaky or old pipes,
  • improve sources of water supply,
  • replace or construct water storage tanks,
  • other infrastructure projects needed to protect public health.

Together, the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds are the most significant source of federal funding for water infrastructure projects. Communities and water quality benefit when we invest in smart and sustainable infrastructure projects. Re-authorizing and increasing funding levels for both SRF programs is vital to improving water quality and protecting communities across the country.