Showing Support for the Clean Water Rule

Voices from all across the United States are standing up for the protection of clean water. Check out what folks are saying this week about the importance of clean water in their lives. A vote for sportsmen’s access and American jobs – The Montana Standard, 11/30 “Montana has a $1.4 billion hunting and fishing industry supporting thousands of jobs in the state. Many renowned American brands—like R.L. Winston Rod Co., Simms Fishing Products and Bozeman Reel Company—have set up shop here because of our world-class natural resources. If we fail to do the things necessary to safeguard those resources, we will be putting American jobs at risk.” Politics and clean water – Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette, 11/29 “According to the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, some 40 percent of Arkansas’ rivers and streams and over 30 percent of our lakes do not meet minimal water quality standards, in part due to agricultural and municipal runoff. Cotton, Crawford and Rutledge are willing to misrepresent the contents of the Clean Water Rule for their political gain when a large percentage of our rivers, streams and lakes–sources of our drinking water–are impaired and would benefit from the Rule.” Maine voices: Dirty runoff into Sebago Lake shows why we need Clean Water Rule – Portland Press Herald, 11/28 “For years, Mainers have relied too heavily on trust and too little on smart regulation to protect our water. Sometimes we make mistakes, and our water quality suffers. If we can get water policy right, all of us benefit.” Ensure the value of our water isn’t taken for granted – Duluth News Tribune, 11/27 “The Clean...

Showing Support for the Clean Water Rule

Voices from all across the United States are standing up for the protection of clean water. Check out what these brewers, business owners, and sportsmen and women have to say this week about the importance of clean water in their lives.   A vote for sportsmen’s access and American jobs – Missoulian, 11/20 “As I was packing the quarters back to my rig through the falling snow, I began thinking of warmer days, when I’ll hopefully be fishing for trout on the Clark Fork and Big Hole rivers. Whether I’m able to enjoy clean mountain streams next summer—and whether my daughter is able to do the same years from now—will be thanks, in part, to the way that Sen. Jon Tester voted recently in Washington.” Senators thanked for Clean Water support – Cape Gazette, 11/20 “Whether we’re fishing, swimming, or hiking, waterways like the Christina River and Delaware River are a big part of what makes Delaware great. Recently the EPA finalized a new rule that would protect these beloved rivers as well as many others like them in Delaware. The new Clean Water Rule protects 55 percent of the streams in Delaware, as well as the drinking water for 280,000 Delawareans.” Vervier: Raise a glass to the clean water rule – The Colorado Statesman, 11/18 “At New Belgium Brewing Company, we know how important water is. Beer, after all, is 90 percent water. If something happens to our water, the negative effect on our business — and our industry — would be substantial.” EPA rule change protects waterways – The Detroit News, 11/18 “The Clean Water Rule, put...

Letter to Congress: Oppose All Ideological and Anti-Environmental Riders

November 19, 2015 (Download the letter here) Dear Member of Congress: Our organizations, along with our millions of members and supporters, urge you to oppose all ideological and anti-environmental riders proposed for inclusion in appropriations legislation for fiscal year 2016, including language that would undermine the Environmental Protection Agency’s and Army Corps of Engineers’ final Clean Water Rule. The Clean Water Rule restores critical pollution safeguards to a variety of our nation’s waterways, including the small streams and wetlands that feed the drinking water of one in three Americans, and provides clarity and certainty to the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act. For decades, the Clean Water Act provided comprehensive protections for water bodies across the country, from the smallest headwater streams to the giant Mississippi River. However, two Supreme Court decisions threw protections for some of our waterways into question. The Clean Water Rule helps protect the waters our children and grandchildren use to drink, swim, and play in. To develop the Clean Water Rule, the agencies engaged in a very transparent and thorough process, including holding more than 400 stakeholder meetings, providing more than 200 days for public comment, and conducting a detailed and open analysis and peer review of the science on which the rule is based. Over 800,000 people commented in support of the rule, and poll after poll has found small businesses, hunters and anglers, and a bipartisan majority of voters in favor of the Clean Water Rule and more protections for our water. Yet, big polluters continue to pursue every angle to block these critical safeguards for our water. Having been unable to...

Making Sense of the Clean Water Rule is Easy

By Jon Devine, Senior Attorney, NRDC. This post was originally publish on Switchboard One of the most often-repeated attacks from politicians who don’t support the Clean Water Rule – the initiative finalized this summer that enhances pollution protections for streams, wetlands, and ponds around the country – is that it is supposedly too complex. For instance, Senator Joni Ernst of Iowa recently wrote: EPA’s change in the definition of what constitutes a water of the U.S has resulted in a rule that is so complex and vague that farmers in my state are concerned that a grass waterway, a ditch or standing water in their fields after a rainstorm could now be regulated by the EPA. Some Iowans have even told me they may need to hire a lawyer to help them sift through the 300 page rule to see if they are in compliance. Hogwash. I freely admit that the rule doesn’t answer every possible future question about where the Clean Water Act applies to polluting activities — that would be impossible, given the variety of water features around the country. But this action significantly clarifies the rules of the road, and I think the primary reason that some people are concerned about the rule and its implementation is that opponents like Senator Ernst have waged a misinformation campaign about what it does and doesn’t do. In response to these exaggerated charges, NRDC developed an infographic to explain the rule in two — count ’em, two — pages. Click on the images below to see them enlarged, or if you would like a version of your very own...

Showing Support for the Clean Water Rule

Voices from all across the United States are standing up for the protection of clean water. Check out what folks are saying this week about the importance of clean and safe water in their lives. Cotton underappreciates miracle of water – Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette – 11/16 “I’m just a retiree, but even I see enough of the world news, and even the news inside our own country, to know a generous miracle when I see one. Federal and state water quality protection laws support the miracle.” Protect Clean water, protect our economy – Helena Independent Record, 11/16 “We’re concerned about the attacks because our businesses, our employees and the taxes we generate depend on clean water. Yet opponents of the rule are ignoring our contributions. Each year nearly $4 billion new dollars come into the Montana economy from visitors to our state. According to Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks, angling annually generates $907 million for our economy, much of it from nonresidents.” For clean water: Don’t ignore science or public – Arkansas Online, 11/14 “Nothing is more fundamental than clean water. In Arkansas, 941,225 people–almost a third of Arkansans–receive their drinking water from streams covered by a new Environmental Protection Agency rule. Outdoor recreation is a large part of Arkansas’ economy. According to a 2006 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey, $2 billion is spent in the state annually on hunting and fishing alone. The delay of clean-water protection jeopardizes one of the largest sources of small-business jobs in the state.” Casey: Don’t throw out EPA’s Clean Water Rule – The Roanoke Times, 11/13 “Public safety should not be a partisan...