Tweet to #ProtectCleanWater

By Michael Kelly, Communications Director, Clean Water Action – follow Michael on Twitter (@MichaelEdKelly) More than 800,000 people called on the Environmental Protection Agency to protect clean water in 2014. Hundreds of thousands did the same in 2012. And 2010. And in the aughts. And every time you ask people whether we should have strong safeguards for the water we drink, the answer is a resounding “YES”. So, what’s up with Congress? As Bob wrote yesterday, the War on Water is back and many in Congress want to make it impossible to protect streams and wetlands. Which is weird because it’s the opposite of what Americans want. Well, we can’t let that happen. We need to make sure our Senators and Representatives know just how much we want to protect clean water. So today were kicking off a social media blitz to show our elected officials that we expect them to stand with us to protect streams and wetlands, not polluters to protect corporate revenue streams. Join in to #ProtectCleanWater. It’s amazing how much impact a few tweets can have. Recent studies have shown that as few as 30 tweets or comments can get the attention of elected officials. So what do you think will happen when we get 100 or 500 or 1,000 tweets telling Senators like @JimInhofe that we expect him to follow the science (like he said he would) and let @EPA #ProtectCleanWater. Think about the power of letting @BobCasey know that we appreciate his support of the campaign and ask him to convince his colleagues to stand with him and us? All it takes to...

Diverse voices speak out as Congress begins assault on clean water

Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2015              Listen to a recording of the teleconference here.  WASHINGTON – A diverse group representing a cross-section of business, conservation, the faith community, and affected cities and towns spoke out today in favor of efforts by the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers to restore clean water protection to streams and wetlands that have been left vulnerable to pollution by legal ambiguities. Speaking via media teleconference in advance of a joint Congressional hearing scheduled for Wednesday on Capitol Hill, four panelists each highlighted the importance of clean water and chided members of Congress for doing the bidding of big polluters rather than standing up to protect American families and businesses that depend on it. Travis County Commissioner Brigid Shea stressed the critical need to protect small streams and wetlands, including those that flow only seasonally, because of their connection to larger waters. “The reality,” said Shea, also a former Austin city councilwoman, “is that water flows downhill, and what happens upstream has a direct impact on communities downstream. In Travis County alone, more than three out of four residents depend on public drinking water sources that are fed by streams that don’t flow year round. EPA’s common-sense rule would ensure that these drinking water sources are better protected from pollution.” The joint hearing between the Senate Environment and Public Works and the House Transportation and Infrastructure committees was organized by Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) and is expected to be vastly imbalanced in favor of polluters and developers who oppose the proposed rule and any effort that would hinder their ability to use America’s waterways as...